CRANBURY: Middlesex County School Boards Association honors two local students

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Amir Moon’s letter of recommendation

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written by Susan Genco and Michele Waldron from Cranbury School
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Amir Moon’s letter of recommendation

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written by Susan Genco and Michele Waldron from Cranbury School

Cranbury students Amir Moon and Daniel Huang have been recognized as tops in their classes for the Middlesex County School Boards Association’s Student Recognition Program.
Each year, the Middlesex County School Boards Association honors one junior and one senior high school student from each school district in the county to be recognized as Student Recognition Program recipients.
The criteria for selection includes students who have overcome difficult academic or personal challenges, model good citizenship and exhibit a spirit and quiet strength that inspire others. The association seeks to honor those students who make their schools a better place simply because they are a part of it.
Amir and Daniel were among those recognized during a ceremony on March 2 at New Brunswick High School.
Previous Cranbury recipients included a student who led a student organization that focused its efforts on creating a safe and supportive environment while educating awareness and resources necessary to fight and reduce teen suicide. Another learned of a worthy charitable organization founded by a former teacher and built student awareness for the organization and its cause by launching a monthly fundraising activity – a tradition that remains today.” Previous winners from other districts included a student who organized a program called “Pedals for Progress,” that arranged bicycles which were no longer needed to be donated to needy children overseas, Eagle scouts, volunteer firemen, and EMTs. Additionally, students have been honored for achieving outstanding academic success, despite disabilities or language barriers.
According to a letter of recommendation written by Princeton High School’s David Rosenfeld, Daniel was selected because he is a hard-working student who “consistently strives to do his best” in his classes.
Daniel enjoys a diverse course load and “enjoys challenging himself intellectually rather than playing it safe.” In 10th grade, he was selected by the Arts Council of Princeton for inclusion in its highly selective literary magazine (only 60 students received this recognition from more than 1,500 submissions). “A sensitive, caring young man who puts the needs of other people before his own, Daniel treats others with respect and kindness. Daniel is highly motivated to help others. He is not only accepting of other people’s differences, but also appreciative of them. His considerate nature and the value he places on celebrating diversity are reflected in the community service experiences in which he has participated during high school.”
Daniel is actively involved in an organization called, “Growing up Accepted as an Individual in America” (GAIA), which visits elementary and middle schools to conduct workshops that promote the organization’s mission to teach respect and diversity. “Daniel has exhibited resilience and a determination and commitment to achieve to the best of his ability. His tenacity and perseverance in the face of adversity are truly admirable,” Mr. Rosenfeld wrote.
Amir’s letter of recommendation, written by Susan Genco and Michele Waldron from Cranbury School, stated that, “Over the years, Amir has developed into an outstanding student, respected leader and compassionate young man. He has worked diligently to learn and grow as a person and a student. Amir demonstrated the strength of character and a strong desire to persevere. He has developed into an exemplary humanitarian, young man and role model to his peers. His compassionate, integrity, character and service to others is second to none. He is hard working, reflective, determined, caring and respectful.”
Amir can be described as, “one of the happiest people you will ever meet, always bringing a smile to your face. His positive energy is contagious. As a leader of the middle school’s Kindness Club, he launched the first “Cranbury Idol” donating the proceeds to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.”
In high school, Amir volunteers his time and talent toward a variety of school and community events, simply for the sake of giving. His “pay it forward” approach is evident in all his future pursuits. “It is with utmost pride and admiration that Amir participated in the People to People Ambassador Program in the summer of 2015. He independently raised funds to pursue his studies, community outreach, and personal dreams. His steadfast dedication, passion for humanity, and commitment to community service has made a lasting impact on the lives of so many people over time.”