Uncertainty principle a more reassuring option for voter

Eric Sucar

It seems like our choices are narrowed. In Ted Cruz, I found a man who actually did exactly what he said he would do in the Senate. His core principles never waned despite the continued attacks on his character. With Cruz, I knew exactly what I was getting.

The same can be said of the Democrats. A Bernie presidency would have results so predictable and negative that one only needs to look at history — modern and not so recent — to know what calamity would soon be in store for us. Moreover, I don’t think it is unfair to expect the same level of corruption and dishonesty to be the hallmark of a Hillary presidency.

Then there is the Donald.

We certainly can’t conclude that he is stupid or unqualified as the occupier of the White House has suggested (yeah, that’s rich). He turned the entire campaign process on its ear, getting the media (who clearly hate him) to finance his campaign by providing nonstop free coverage. He rejected the advice of the professional political class who led the Republicans to resounding defeats in the past two presidential elections and showed that they were stuck in a collective brain freeze.

Despite his sometimes bombastic rhetoric and his unapologetic “take no prisoners” attitude, he has garnered the enthusiastic support of millions of Americans, including Democrats, minorities and those who have never voted before, who see the entire government as broken and are looking for someone to “fix” it.

I really have no idea how a Trump presidency will work out, but at this time I am going to have to go with the uncertainty principle over the absolute certainty of the disaster of a Hillary presidency.

James Fitzmaurice
Rumson