Home EB Sentinel EB Sentinel News Monroe grassroots organization promotes solidarity after clashes in Charlottesville

Monroe grassroots organization promotes solidarity after clashes in Charlottesville

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MONROE — Within 36 hours of the mayhem in Charlottesville, Virginia, that gripped the nation, Irene Linet, co-chair of Indivisible of Monroe Township, organized a rally in support of togetherness.

Protests in Charlottesville on Aug. 12 turned violent when white nationalists clashed with activists protesting racism.

One woman was killed and many were injured when a car, allegedly driven by a rally participant, sped into the crowd of anti-racism protesters. Two Virginia State troopers also were killed when the helicopter they were in crashed.

“Today we stand in solidarity with the citizens of Charlottesville, Virginia, against the hateful message of white supremacy, white nationalism, fascism, anti-Semitism and bigotry,” Linet said.

The rally in Monroe was held on the front lawn adjacent to the Monroe Township Senior Center, Halsey Reed Road, on Aug. 16.

Members of Indivisible of Monroe Township – one of 6,000 nationwide grassroots organizations formed after the November election to effect change through political action – were joined by residents, legislators and other community leaders at the rally.

Those who spoke included Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-New Jersey), State Senator Linda Greenstein (D-Mercer-Middlesex), Assemblymen Dan Benson and Wayne DeAngelo (D Mercer-Middlesex), Middlesex County Freeholder Leslie Koppel, Monroe Township Mayor Gerald Tamburro and members of the Monroe Township Council.

Linet called for residents to not stay silent in the face of racism and bigotry, and asked for a moment of silence for Heather Heyer and the two Virginia State Troopers.

Greenstein said the rally held in Monroe and events taking place around the country are re-affirming that everyone is and should be welcome no matter one’s faith, creed, race or sexual orientation.

Tamburro said people have an obligation to speak out as citizens, not just in the face of the horrific display of hatred in Charlottesville, but at all times when one sees discrimination.

For more information about Indivisible of Monroe Township, visit monroe.indivisible.blue.

Contact Kathy Chang at kchang@newspapermediagroup.com.

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