Home Princeton Packet Princeton Packet News Hun School announces funding in support of student diversity

Hun School announces funding in support of student diversity

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The Hun School of PrincetonPHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON
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2018 MLK Leadership Summit at The Hun School.PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON
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Xavier, right, and his sister Missy created The Goss Family Scholarship in honor of their father and late mother, who worked long hours and sacrificed to send them to HunPHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON
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The Hun School of PrincetonPHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON
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2018 MLK Leadership Summit at The Hun School.PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON
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Xavier, right, and his sister Missy created The Goss Family Scholarship in honor of their father and late mother, who worked long hours and sacrificed to send them to HunPHOTO COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON

Four Hun School families are leading the charge to support student diversity at The Hun School.

Siblings Missy Goss and Xavier Goss; siblings Jillian Fonseca Mederos and Peter J. Fonseca; and members of the Subramoni family have established three new scholarships intended for students of color with demonstrated financial need. Recipients of all three scholarships have been named and will enroll this fall.

A fourth grant, from Yvonne Koh and her father George Koh, has been made in support of student programming.

“I’m hoping for the multiplier effect: a broader impact,” donor and 1999 graduate Xavier Goss said in a prepared statement. “I want to motivate other people to do this and hope this turns into a movement.”

Xavier and his sister Missy created The Goss Family Scholarship in honor of their father and late mother, who worked long hours and sacrificed to send them to Hun, according to the statement. The Goss Family Scholarship will be awarded to a talented Black student with demonstrated financial need to attend Hun for four years.

Out of affection for the school and a beloved teacher who retired in June, father-daughter duo George and Yvonne Koh, both Hun graduates from Hong Kong, established the The Dianne Somers International Program Fund, according to the statement. This fund will support programs and activities for international students.

Siblings Jillian Fonseca Mederos and Peter J. Fonseca celebrated a milestone in their parents’ lives – retirement – by endowing a scholarship fund for a student with demonstrated financial need who is of Latinx descent.

“It was important to create the scholarship fund in honor of my parents because they provided me with the opportunity to attend Hun,” Peter J. Fonseca said in the statement. “The school taught me how to communicate, think strategically, and allowed me to be more confident going into college, which have been key attributes to my success.”

Together with their mother, Dr. Jaya Subramoni, Raja and Meena Subramoni paid tribute to their late father by establishing the Subramoni Family Scholarship, a four-year scholarship awarded to a female day student of color with demonstrated financial need.

“As the children of immigrants, we saw what hard work and making something for your family really means,” Raja Subramoni said in the statement.

“Each of these gifts creates a life-changing opportunity for a remarkable young person, and at the same time meaningfully enriches our campus community,” Head of School Jon Brougham said in the statement. “We are deeply grateful that alumni who know us best support Hun in this potent and inspiring way.”

The Hun School of Princeton is a co-educational, private day and boarding school that serves students from 20 countries and 15 states; 45% of students identify as non-White, and 20% as BIPOC (Black Indigenous People of Color), according to the statement.

Roughly 30% of students receive a financial aid award commensurate with their family’s demonstrated need.

The Hun School serves 650 students in grades 6-12, and post graduates.

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