Administrator retires from Princeton schools after almost six decades in education

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For Robert Ginsberg, Dec. 31 marks the last day of 2021 – and the last day of his five-decade career in education.

Ginsberg, who is the acting assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction, is retiring from the Princeton Public Schools after 33 years in the school district – including more than two decades as the principal of the Johnson Park School.

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Ginsberg’s career spans 58 years, beginning as a teacher and assistant principal in Brooklyn, New York.

Ginsberg arrived in the Princeton school district in 1988 as the principal of the Littlebrook School. After 10  years as the principal at the elementary school, he was appointed to the post of assistant superintendent in the then-Princeton Regional School District.

Ginsberg stayed in the post for one year. He requested to be placed back in the schools, and was named principal of the Johnson Park School in 1999. He stayed in that post, until he moved back into administration in mid-2020 as the acting assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction.

Not wanting to overlook Ginsberg’s retirement, school board members praised Ginsberg and presented him with a proclamation and a certificate of excellence at the school board’s Dec. 14 meeting. The proclamation set May 6, 2022, as a special day to celebrate Ginsberg’s achievements.

The proclamation and the certificate of excellence are the latest acknowledgments of Ginsberg’s impact on the Princeton Public Schools.

The Johnson Park School’s amphitheater and outdoor teaching space was named the Robert Ginsberg Amphitheater last year at the request of the Johnson Park School PTO.

School board president Beth Behrend thanked Ginsberg at the board’s Dec. 14 meeting.

“It’s hard for us to put into words how many lives you have influenced and how many children you have inspired over the years. We owe you very deep gratitude,” Behrend said.

School board member Dan Dart said he was looking forwards to Bob Ginsberg Day on May 6 at the Johnson Park School. The school board meeting is “just the beginning of the celebration of you,” he told Ginsberg.

“From someone who put two daughters through your school, I and they and my wife are eternally grateful. Thank you, Bob, on a personal level,” Dart said.

Dart’s remarks were echoed by school board member Susan Kanter. The Johnson Park School families have a special relationship with Ginsberg, she said.

“I don’t know how many families have come up to me and said to tell Bob we miss him and we love him and how much he has done,” Kanter said.

Kanter said she hoped Ginsberg would continue to reach out to the children. He always acknowledged their special accomplishments, “which goes above and beyond, which is always his way,” she said.

Ginsberg wrote to the children long after they had left elementary school, acknowledging their achievements big and small, Kanter said. He made every child feel that he was always cheering for them, she said.

In his letter to the school board announcing his plans to retire earlier this year, Ginsberg wrote that he appreciated the unwavering support from staff, parents, the community, school board members and students.

“It’s folks in all these groups and especially the latter – the kids – who have made being a public school educator such a joyous, joyful and rewarding career,” Ginsberg wrote.

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