Monmouth County News Briefs, Nov. 17

The Jewish Heritage Museum of Monmouth County presents “COVID-19 and Mental Health,” a Zoom talk by Amanda Levy, on Nov. 21 at 2 p.m. Admission is free. To make a reservation and to receive the Zoom link, call 732-252-6990 or visit http://www.jhmomc.org

Levy, a psychotherapist and social work supervisor, will lead an interactive discussion about creating a healthy mind and body balance in these challenging times, according to a press release.

Participants are encouraged to share their experiences and ideas about how to handle it all, finding the best and easiest ways to create a healthy balance of caution and concern, along with developing strategies of self-care.

Levy has worked with children and families for more than 30 years. She is currently the director of clinical services for Yachad, an agency of the Orthodox Union that creates programs and services for people with developmental disabilities, according to the press release.

 

The Shrewsbury Chorale will present a live in-person holiday concert under the new leadership of interim artistic director Fiona Smith Sutherland at 4 p.m. Dec. 5 at Trinity Episcopal Church, 65 W. Front St., Red Bank.

The concert is entitled “Glorias & Carols: Ancient and Modern” and will feature works of Vivaldi, Whitacre, Willcocks, Tavener, Mathias, Gjeilo, Michael John Trotta and more. Allan Robinson will accompany the chorale on the Hauptwerk virtual pipe organ, according to the press release.

Sutherland joined the chorale as interim music director in September following a two-year period of serving as the chorale’s accompanist.

She also serves as the full-time director of traditional music at Tower Hill Presbyterian Church in Red Bank. She is also the staff accompanist and assistant director for the Lakeside Choraliers in Montvale, according to the press release.

Tickets to the Dec. 4 performance in Red Bank are $25; $20 for seniors and students; and $10 for children. Advance ticket sales are discounted.

To order tickets, call 732-747-1362, or send an e-mail to theshrewsburychorale@gmail.com. Tickets may be purchased online at www.shrewsburychorale.org. All attendees must wear a mask and bring proof of COVID-19 vaccination.

 

New Jersey Assemblywoman Serena DiMaso’s (R-Monmouth) bill increasing funds for wildlife conservation and wetlands preservation through the state’s waterfowl stamps has been signed into law by Gov. Phil Murphy.

The bill (A-3897) increases the annual fee for a New Jersey waterfowl stamp to $15 from $10 for a person without a valid state firearm hunting or bow and arrow license, and to $10 from $5 for those possessing a hunting license, according to a press release.

Waterfowl hunters age 16 years and older are required to purchase a New Jersey waterfowl stamp, also known as the “duck stamp,” in addition to the federal duck stamp, to hunt in the state, according to the press release.

“The waterfowl stamp program gives hunters a direct stake in the preservation of the state’s wetlands and this law will further enhance those efforts from Sussex to Cape May counties and everywhere in between,” DiMaso said.

The state’s duck stamp program began in 1984 and fees were last increased in 1996. By law, the funds from the stamps are earmarked for the acquisition, improvement and enhancement of waterfowl habitat and wetlands, and public access of waterfowl habitat areas, according to the press release.

 

Legislation that seeks to make it easier for drivers to confirm their vehicle is registered with the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) by allowing drivers to display electronic proof of vehicle registration when prompted has been signed into law by Gov. Phil Murphy.

Until now, the operator of a motor vehicle was only allowed to provide a registration certificate in the traditional paper form to a police officer or a judge, according to a press release from the New Jersey Assembly Democrats.

The new law will allow the MVC to provide an electronic copy of vehicle registration upon renewal. The electronic copy from MVC or a picture of the registration on an electronic device will qualify as proof of registration, according to the press release.

 

A bill expanding sports betting to e-sports competitions with a majority of players over 18 has been signed into law by Gov. Phil Murphy, according to press releases from the New Jersey Assembly Republicans and New Jersey Assembly Democrats.

“E-sports have exploded in recent years and we need to allow the casinos and racetracks in New Jersey to participate in this revenue generating business,” said Assemblyman Ron Dancer (R-Monmouth, Ocean, Middlesex, Burlington).

“It is important for our state to capitalize on this rapidly growing industry in order to both give our residents what they want and to boost our economy,” said Assemblyman Eric Houghtaling (D-Monmouth).

“With online sports betting now legal in New Jersey and a large number of people already interested in this type of gaming, the time is right for us to expand legal wagering beyond traditional sports,” Houghtaling said.

Sports betting law had specifically forbidden wagering on electronic sports and competitive video games except for certain international sporting events, according to the press releases.

The new law revises the definitions of “sports event” and “prohibited sports event” to allow sports betting on e-sports where the majority of players are adults and even during such events as competitive eating contests.

Several state casinos and two racetracks, the Meadowlands and Monmouth Park, have on-site sports wagering lounges and online sports pools. In 2019, sports wagering brought in more than $299 million in revenue for the casinos and racetracks, according to the press releases.

 

Gov. Phil Murphy has signed legislation into law that will prohibit a municipality from requiring a license or permit of anyone under the age of 18 who is attempting to operate a temporary business such as a lemonade stand, according to a press release from the New Jersey Assembly Democrats.

The press release relates incidents in which children’s lemonade stands were being shut down in places such as Utah and New York City.

Similar laws also exist to prohibit municipalities from regulating the solicitation of snow shoveling services, according to the press release.

Assemblyman Robert Karabinchak (D-Middlesex) said, “No child should have their creativity and hard work discouraged by legal requirements that are intended for much more complex, adult-run businesses. There is no harm in letting children run a small, temporary business without a permit, especially when the fees would take away from their limited earnings.”

 

The New Jersey School Boards Association is encouraging students to submit entries to the Garden State Film Festival’s student submission category, “New Jersey Hometown Documentary Short” by the Jan. 8 deadline.

This category is reserved for works that are written, directed and shot by New Jersey high school students. Films must focus on some aspect of their hometown, including topics like profiles of interesting persons, places, time periods or subjects related to the arts.

This film submission category has been created to encourage young filmmakers’ creativity while instilling a sense of pride in their hometowns and state, according to information provided by the NJSBA.

Students are encouraged to submit entries on their own or through their school by the Jan. 8 deadline. The Garden State Film Festival’s professional jury will select winning films in various categories. The festival will take place from March 23-27 in Asbury Park. For more information, visit GSFF.org

 

The Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners has congratulated the five cadets from the Marine Academy of Science and Technology (MAST) who were chosen to participate in the christening of the USS New Jersey (SSW-796) as members of the color guard at Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va., on Nov.13.

“We are so proud of the five cadets from MAST who presented the nation’s colors during the christening of the USS New Jersey, a new Virginia Class attack submarine currently under construction,” Director Thomas A. Arnone said. “This is a testament to the dedicated cadets who are attending MAST and this is an incredible opportunity for them to honor our country.”

The cadets chosen to present the nation’s colors for the submarine’s christening were Dylan Agnese (Lincroft), Jack Arhanic (Fair Haven) Tessa Campolattaro (Rumson), Sam Puleio (Tinton Falls) and Brandon Weiss (Oceanport), according to a press release.

MAST is a co-educational four-year high school that is a part of the Monmouth County Vocational School District. Cadets who attend MAST are enrolled in the Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, according to the press release.